Quittintime: Homemade stroke sander
 

The entire forum is open to viewing. But you must Register if you wish to post.


Woodworking >> Woodworking Gallery

Pages: 1
Armin



Reged: May 21 2002
Posts: 352
Loc: Michigan's upper peninsula
Homemade stroke sander
      #1954 - Thu Jun 13 2002 07:16 PM Attachment (1673 downloads)

During the early 80?s used woodworking equipment was pretty much limited to the heavy mastodon industrial sized stuff. This along with the proverbial lack of funds prompted me to make a stroke sander. The basic machine is rather simple making it the ideal project for the happy woodworker with too much time on his hands.

One feature I incorporated was independent table raising screws and a table design to allow the table to be set on an angle to sand tapered material. I have had this machine for 20 years and it works so well I never bothered to upgrade to a real made in Taiwan factory model. At the time the outlay in cash was less than $300, this included a new 1-? hp motor and new switch as well as four 1? pillow blocks. The steel shafts and plate was pillaged from the scrap bin of a tool shop. It took me about a week to build, since I did get carried away with the aesthetics


--------------------
www.northernsunwoodworks.com


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Armin



Reged: May 21 2002
Posts: 352
Loc: Michigan's upper peninsula
Re: Homemade stroke sander [Re: Armin]
      #1958 - Thu Jun 13 2002 07:30 PM Attachment (1370 downloads)

detail pic of belt tension end. The little Tee handle gizmo pushes the steel plate-pillow block base to set the tension. The steel plate rides on formica strips and has a key that rides in a slot milled into the base of the machine. the plate is held down by two floating bolts that are snugged up once the tension is set. The dust hood needs work, this was a temporary fix that, with the help of duct tape is still in use 20 years later.

The hand wheel, raises and lowers the table, the nut on the top holds the wheel in place as well as allows the use of a socket mounted in a drill motor to speed the task of raising or lowering the table which has a 20 inch travel.

--------------------
www.northernsunwoodworks.com

Edited by Armin (Thu Jun 13 2002 07:39 PM)


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Pro_Dek



Reged: May 02 2002
Posts: 533
Loc: Seattle
Re: Homemade stroke sander [Re: Armin]
      #1971 - Fri Jun 14 2002 05:06 AM

Armin - That's amazing- How do you find sanding belts that big? They probably aren't cheep. Do you use this sander for any one particular thing?

--------------------
Bob
"Rather be a hammer than a nail"



Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Armin



Reged: May 21 2002
Posts: 352
Loc: Michigan's upper peninsula
Re: Homemade stroke sander [Re: Pro_Dek]
      #2000 - Sat Jun 15 2002 01:51 AM

Thanks Bob, Actually the belts are available from most sandpaper suppliers, Klingspore furnishes mine, and they are custom made to any length. This machine takes a 6 x 199 inch belt and cost about 20 bucks each. Since the belts are long they don?t generate a lot of heat and won?t clog before they get dull. I originally used this machine to sand almost everything I made, a pack of five belts would last me a year and I sanded a lot of wood. A stroke sander, with a little bit of creativity allows the operator to sand different shapes, The concave section of the curly maple mantel posted in the gallery was sanded in a few minutes using a custom block as a platen. Another advantage of a stoke sander is because of the soft felt pressure block it will not leave the telltale ?Thump? or glaze splice mark from the sanding belt like a belt sander or wide belt will. To the naked eye it doesn?t make much difference but once you stain and topcoat the wood it sticks out like a sore thumb.
Originally I used this machine to sand everything from tabletops to paneling, casework and face frames. Now I do most of the flat work using the wide belt. The biggest use I have for this machine now is sanding the edges of finger jointed boxes flush with the sides. My wife builds finger jointed instrument calibration cases for a supplier of Lear Jet ground support equipment. When she runs the next batch I?ll post some pictures of the sander in operation.


--------------------
www.northernsunwoodworks.com

Edited by Armin (Sat Jun 15 2002 01:55 AM)


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Armin



Reged: May 21 2002
Posts: 352
Loc: Michigan's upper peninsula
Sander detail underside [Re: Armin]
      #2001 - Sat Jun 15 2002 02:07 AM Attachment (1064 downloads)

The pic shows the table raising carriage.
The knob in the center is fastened to a tapped Tee block and takes up the play in the elevating mechanism. The knob in the front snugs up the side of the carriage against the Formica wear strips. The table rides on 4 wooden rollers down a vee groove in the rail.

--------------------
www.northernsunwoodworks.com


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Pages: 1



Extra information
0 registered and 2 anonymous users are browsing this forum.

Moderator:   

Print Topic

Forum Permissions
      You cannot start new topics
      You cannot reply to topics
      HTML is disabled
      UBBCode is enabled

Rating:
Topic views: 21569

Rate this topic

Jump to

Contact Us Quittintime

Powered by UBB.threads™ 6.5.5

Please pay
our friends
a visit

(We do not
recieve income
from these links.)